Thalia Williams's blog

What’s Up with Steroids?

Steroids are organic compounds which the body makes naturally to combat disease and illnesses and to help balance the body when needed. The most common form of steroids seen in the body is in the form of a hormone. Two of the most heard about hormones that the body produces are the sex hormones known as estrogen and testosterone, with estrogen being predominate in females and testosterone in males. A problem regarding hormones is the abuse and misuse of anabolic steroids which are man-made versions of the male sex hormone, testosterone.

Some Tips on Internet Safety Using Parental Controls

The internet proves time and time again that it is one of the greatest technologies invented through how much help it provides in everyday life. However, it can also be seen as a potential danger to children due to inappropriate images and videos available online as well as people who may try to harm them. Luckily, with the improvement of technology there are also improvements in protections that are offered to parents, known as parental controls, to help monitor what your kids are seeing on the internet.

Does Having Naloxone in My House Enable My Child to Use Opioids?

In communities across our country, first responders and families alike are equipping themselves with Naloxone (Narcan) to treat a person overdosing from heroin or other opioids. When used in time, it’s a a bonafide miracle, bringing back to life a loved one whose respiratory system has shut down and whose death is imminent. But because of this incredible ability, some parents may wonder if having a Naloxone rescue kit on hand encourages risky opioid use — after all, if your loved one knows he or she can be revived, why not continue using heroin or prescription pain pills? It’s an understandable concern. But it’s not as simple as that. Here’s what the experts say: Making Naloxone widely available is one of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ three priority areas for responding to the opioid crisis. According to a recent Addiction Science & Clinical Practice article, no studies conducted to date have found increased opioid use due to the availability of Naloxone.

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