AZ Parents Connect Blog

What You Need to Know About OTC Drugs

Frequently misused and abused drugs that are often forgotten about are over-the-counter medications.  Over-the-counter medications do not require a prescription and include cold, allergy and cough medications that we are able purchase from any pharmacy.**  Some over-the-counter medications do have the potential for misuse when taken at a higher than recommended dose, when taken to get high, or when mixed with other medications or drugs.

What over-the-counter medications should you be aware and wary of?  The most commonly misused ones are Dextromethorphan (DXM) and Loperamide. 

The Shocking Trend in Alcohol Use

With a heavy focus being placed on the opioid epidemic, it is important that we don’t forget about or disregard the other substances that impact the health and wellbeing of our youth.  One such substance is alcohol.  The National Institute on Drug Abuse funds an annual Monitoring the Future Survey that measures drug and alcohol use and views in our 8th, 10th, and 12th graders, and last year’s results were shocking. 

Does Having Naloxone in My House Enable My Child to Use Opioids?

In communities across our country, first responders and families alike are equipping themselves with Naloxone (Narcan) to treat a person overdosing from heroin or other opioids. When used in time, it’s a a bonafide miracle, bringing back to life a loved one whose respiratory system has shut down and whose death is imminent. But because of this incredible ability, some parents may wonder if having a Naloxone rescue kit on hand encourages risky opioid use — after all, if your loved one knows he or she can be revived, why not continue using heroin or prescription pain pills? It’s an understandable concern. But it’s not as simple as that. Here’s what the experts say: Making Naloxone widely available is one of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ three priority areas for responding to the opioid crisis. According to a recent Addiction Science & Clinical Practice article, no studies conducted to date have found increased opioid use due to the availability of Naloxone.

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